EUROPEAN HEALTH STAKEHOLDERS NETWORK

Welcome Guest! | Log In
Articles
  • Prostate cancer a stable, reliable, predictable illness is causing 60.000 men to die every year in the EU. While the suffering and sorrow is immeasurable, the cost of care to our public health systems measure up to 17 billion Euros in the EU for only the first year from diagnosis[1].  This figure does not address the amount of lost...

  • Prostate cancer represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality within the western world.  Death rates have tripled over the last 30 years, and prostate cancer is now the most common malignancy of man, and second most common cause of male cancer deaths.

    For many years prostate cancer remained a Cinderella illness, with little interest in research and prevention.  However,...

  • Cancer of the prostate (PCa) is now recognized as one of the most important medical problems facing the male population. In Europe, PCa is the most common solid neoplasm, with an incidence rate of 214 cases per 1000 men. Furthermore, PCa is currently the second most common cause of cancer death in men. (Ref EAU 2010 guidelines). Prostate cancer affects mostly elderly males and is often...

  • The UK government and its European counterparts should harness the opportunity presented by this year’s European Week Against Cancer (25-31 May) to discuss and identify the future needs of health policies to address the changing face of cancer.

    The European Week Against Cancer takes place against the backdrop of governments seeking to cut health and other budgets in the wake of...

  • Prostate cancer remains one of the most common malignancies, is still under-researched and is not well served by novel therapies, particularly when tumours progress to the more deadly castrate resistant phase.

    There is a significant opportunity to develop new therapies that delay the progression to castrate-resistant disease and to treat castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) once it...

  • Androgen suppression is the first line treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Even patients with castration refractory disease should have continued androgen suppression.
    Patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer should receive second line hormonal therapy (anti-androgen). Several other hormonal manipulations can follow this treatment:  corticosteroids, estrogens,...